Tag

Copy

Browsing

Writing copy to grab your reader’s attention is hard. You might spend weeks testing different ideas for nothing. Even if the product or service you’re selling is great, it doesn’t necessarily make writing captivating copy any easier. But there is an exercise you can do to write copy with a much greater chance of success. And strangely, it involves spending time in your reader’s bed. Huh? Between the sheets Of course, I don’t literally mean…

“All my experience says that for a great many products, long copy sells more than short…” Those are the words of David Ogilvy, in Ogilvy on Advertising. He was a pretty experienced guy when it came to copywriting… Did a few good things, apparently. Interestingly, Ogilvy went on to suggest one of the reasons behind this idea is “advertisements with long copy convey the impression that you have something important to say, whether people read the copy…

At the end of the 80s there was really only one widely recognised skateboarding company: Powell Peralta. Started by two of the biggest names in skateboarding – particularly Stacey Peralta – the company was very successful. Indeed, it was pretty much the team to ride for. Its elite skating team – the Bones Brigade – included a young Tony Hawk. Nowadays, he’s perhaps the only universally recognised name in skateboarding. Another famous rider who you might…

If you’re a copywriter wondering which books you should ask for this Christmas, or if you’re searching for the best books to buy a copywriter… Help is at hand. Here you’ll find five recommendations that will help inspire and influence anyone who writes to sell. In fact, influence is actually the title of the first pick… Influence by Robert Cialdini Most copywriters will have read this. I have. In fact, I’ve read it a couple of times. But before too long I’ll…

I was recently in the hot seat for a monthly live Twitter event organised by ProCopywriters called #ProCopyChat. It’s basically an hour where the guest fields questions about copy. It was pretty intense with chatter flying all over the shop, but it was also a lot of fun. In case you didn’t get to catch the event live, or wanted to review my answers all in one place, I thought it would be a good…

Something a little different this week… Rather than sharing some insight with you here in this article, we’re going to delve inside my brand new book – The Art of the Click – and quarry some insight from there. You see, my publisher has set up a cool little thing were you can access and read a sample chapter of the book. The chapter I’ve made available is a chapter that delves into the importance of ideas.…

Before we get into this piece… A thank you. Thank you to all those readers who took part in my live webinar last Thursday (30th August). It was great to chat to you and from the feedback I’ve had, people found it really useful. That’s great. If you were unable to attend but you did pre-order the book, you should have received an email from me with the recording. Plus…you should have received a link…

I think it was Kurt Vonnegut who said it… “If you can’t explain your story to a fourteen-year-old in one sentence, you’ve got a problem with your story.” Something like that. Possibly. And hell, if he didn’t say it, he should have. It sounds like something he’d say. Anyway, it’s a useful little thought. Indeed, I had it in the back of my mind all through my years studying creative writing and it served me…

“Er…it’s actually fruit infusion for me.” What? I’d just asked fellow copywriter, André Spiteri, if he prefers putting the milk in before the tea bag or after the water. I live a pretty controversial life myself by putting the milk in first… And in Earl Grey no less, an already-too-weak-tea in most people’s eyes. But blimey… This Spiteri chap blows my blasphemy out of the water. “Yeah,” he goes on, “I’m not a tea drinker…

I have a confession. Each night, around nine o’clock, my fiancée and I sit down and turn on the television. What we watch might shock you. You see, typically, we don’t watch a lot of television. I’m usually reading. At the moment I’m being very cultured reading Walter Isaacson’s obscenely heavy biography of Leonardo Da Vinci. If Ruth isn’t reading, she’ll be listing to a documentary podcast or playbacks of counselling sessions. If our dog…